Cycling / Active Travel

This course is designed to provide a solid introduction to walking and cycling and is suitable for professionals working in the fields of transport planning, transport policy, highway engineering, public realm, road danger, public health, or with managerial responsibility for these roles. It will also be of interest to people addressing walking, cycling and inclusive transport issues within the third sector and academia. Delegates will be able to plan a cycling and walking network and understand the key issues which underpin best practice planning and design.

Overview:

Concerns about the detrimental impacts of car-based transport are well-documented (Bassett et al., 2008; World Health Organisation, 2018). Creating cities that reduce car use and facilitate physical activity via transport is now seen as a global priority from environmental and health perspectives (Giles-Corti, 2015). The European Commission promotes walking and cycling (2016) as do many EU member states (Fraser, 2011). In the UK, since the early 1990s there has been an increasing emphasis on walking and cycling policy (Department for Transport, 2017 and Golbluff and Aldred, 2012), and interest in walking and cycling to promote health; for example, the ‘‘Healthy Streets” approach adopted by the Mayor of London (TfL, 2017). Jones et al. (2007) has extended the logic of design to include highways acting as ‘places’ as well as through routes.

However, UK walking and cycling policy has so far broadly failed to comprehensively increase levels of use and the UK has cycling levels that remain lower than most other EU countries (European Commission, 2013). Cycling accounts for approximately 26% of trips in The Netherlands, 10% in Germany and only 2% in the UK (Netherlands Institute for Transport Policy Analysis, 2018).

The shift from a car dominated network to one that enables walking and cycling requires a vision for the future, which can be realised through the skills of planners and engineers, hence the importance of this training.

Aims & Objectives:

Learning outcomes:

At the end of the course, participants will understand:

  • Legal duties underpinning the need to plan and design for walking and cycling
  • Different impacts of automobility on different groups – children, women, older people and disabled
  • Different infrastructure preferences of different groups; and who we potentially include or exclude when we design
  • How to measure road danger
  • Planning a network for walking and cycling (Propensity to Cycle Tool and Liveable Neighbourhood concept)
  • Auditing, co-design and consultation with the public
  • Understanding of key design issues relating to links
  • Understanding of key design issues relating to crossings and intersections
  • Have an overview of relevant design guides

Course Outline:

Part 1 (or Day 1)

CONTEXT & PLANNING

This part of the course is focussed on how to begin planning a network including consultation, understanding potential and supressed demand, and network planning.

  • Legal duties placed on local authorities to plan and design for walking and cycling:
  • Health and Social Care Act 2012 to promote public health
  • Equality Act which protects people by age, gender and ability
  • Different impacts of automobility on different groups – children, women, older people and disabled
  • Different infrastructure preferences of different groups; and who we potentially include or exclude when we design
  • How to measure road danger; moving from road safety to road danger – what’s the difference?
  • Age, gender and road danger
  • Assessing ‘Transport Assessment’; Trips and ‘mobilities of care’ – who’s time do we value?
  • Planning a network for walking and cycling; Propensity to Cycle Tool in relation to commuting and travel to school. Mini-Holland and the Liveable Neighbourhood concept.
  • Audit, consultation, co-design and participation with stakeholder and communities – ensuring inclusive consultation processes

Part 2 (or Day 2)

DESIGNING FOR WALKING & CYCLING

This part of the course is focused on design. It focusses on how we design ‘Equal Streets’ ; unpicking highways design convention – what works (in terms of cycling and walking environments) and for whom does it work?

  • Design guidance (CROW, LTN 1/20, DMRB, LCDS, Inclusive Mobility)
  • 5 Attributes of design
  • Links: Review of current international, UK and London guidance in relation to mixing motor and cycle traffic
  • Protected cycling infrastructure
  • Bus, trams and cycling
  • One-way streets
  • Modal filters and traffic reduction
  • Crossings
  • Side road junctions
  • Intersections and roundabouts
  • What does good look like? Can it be measured? The pros and cons of different street assessment models.

Mode of Delivery:

  • Introduction and discussion about people’s experience of walking and cycling – particularly cycling with older people or children
  • Interactive Exercises – Videos of 3 streets types with different levels of traffic. Groups work to establish which type of infrastructure would be appropriate and for whom?
  • Discussion – at key points
  • Visual Aids e.g. videos, PowerPoint, drawings aids
  • Side road junction design exercise – on site if possible
  • Open Workshop
  • Feedback Activity
  • Final Assessment

Benefits of Attending:

The course will provide delegates with up to date knowledge of latest guidance and thinking in relation to equal streets, walking and cycling. Further in-depth design training including reviewing kerbs, crossing types and signals in more detail would be available

For follow up courses, comments made by delegates - either verbally or from evaluation forms – will be taken into account.

Intended For:

This course is designed to provide a solid introduction to walking and cycling and is suitable for professionals working in the fields of transport planning, transport policy, highway engineering, public realm, road danger, public health, or with managerial responsibility for these roles. It will also be of interest to people addressing walking, cycling and inclusive transport issues within the third sector and academia.

Pre-Course Requirements:

·Some pre-course reading is recommended

  • No prior knowledge or qualification is required

Suggested reading:

Aldred, R., Watson, T., Lovelace, R. and Woodcock, J. (2017) ‘Barriers to Investing in Cycling: stakeholder views from England’. Transportation Research A

Pooley, C., Tight, M., Jones, T., Horton, D., Scheldeman, G., Jopson, A., Mullen, C., Chisholm, A., Strano, E. and Constantine, S., (2011). ‘Understanding walking and cycling: Summary of key findings and recommendations’.

Pucher, J. and Buehler, R., (2008). ‘Making cycling irresistible: lessons from the Netherlands, Denmark and Germany’. Transport Reviews, 28(4), pp.495-528.

Sanchez de Madariaga’s (2013) 'From Women in Transport to Gender in Transport'

All our courses can be offered as in-house training