Active Travel: Designing for Walking & Cycling

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This course is designed to provide a solid introduction to walking and cycling. The course will provide delegates with up to date knowledge of latest guidance and thinking in relation to equal streets, walking and cycling. Further in-depth design training including reviewing kerbs, crossing types and signals in more detail would be available.

This course is available as a standalone 1-day course, or as a 2-day course combined with our Active Travel: Context & Planning course.

Also available as an online training course.

Please note the online version of this training course will be split into modules.

Overview:

Our Active Travel Designing for Walking and Cycling course is designed to provide a solid introduction to walking and cycling and is suitable for professionals working in the fields of transport planning, transport policy, highway engineering, public realm, road danger, public health, or with managerial responsibility for these roles. It will also be of interest to people addressing walking, cycling and inclusive transport issues within the third sector and academia.

On completion of this course, delegates will be able to design a cycling and walking network and understand the key issues which underpin best practice planning and design

Aims & Objectives:

At the end of the course, participants will understand:

  • Overview of relevant design guides
  • Key design issues relating to links
  • Key design issues relating to crossings and intersections
  • Design of other features such as loading, parking, bus stops and direction signs

Course Outline:

  • Design guidance (CROW, LTN 1/20, DMRB, LCDS, Inclusive Mobility)
  • 5 Attributes of design
  • Links: Review of current international, UK and London guidance in relation to mixing motor and cycle traffic
  • Protected cycling infrastructure
  • Bus, trams and cycling
  • One-way streets
  • Modal filters and traffic reduction
  • Crossings
  • Side road junctions
  • Intersections and roundabouts
  • What does good look like? Can it be measured? The pros and cons of different street assessment models.

Mode of Delivery:

  • Online slideshow and discussion

Benefits of Attending:

The course will provide delegates with up to date knowledge of latest guidance and thinking in relation to equal streets, walking and cycling. Further in-depth design training including reviewing kerbs, crossing types and signals in more detail would be available

For follow up courses, comments made by delegates - either verbally or from evaluation forms – will be taken into account.

Intended For:

This course is designed to provide a solid introduction to walking and cycling and is suitable for professionals working in the fields of transport planning, transport policy, highway engineering, public realm, road danger, public health, or with managerial responsibility for these roles. It will also be of interest to people addressing walking, cycling and inclusive transport issues within the third sector and academia.

Pre-Course Requirements:

 

  • It would be helpful for delegates to be familiar with Department for Transport Local Walking and Cycling Infrastructure Plan guidance and Local Transport Note 1-20 Cycle Infrastructure Design. Parts of the course also draw on the Active Travel Wales Design Guidance.
  • No prior knowledge is required.

 

Suggested reading:

Aldred, R., Watson, T., Lovelace, R. and Woodcock, J. (2017) ‘Barriers to Investing in Cycling: stakeholder views from England’. Transportation Research A

Pooley, C., Tight, M., Jones, T., Horton, D., Scheldeman, G., Jopson, A., Mullen, C., Chisholm, A., Strano, E. and Constantine, S., (2011). ‘Understanding walking and cycling: Summary of key findings and recommendations’.

Pucher, J. and Buehler, R., (2008). ‘Making cycling irresistible: lessons from the Netherlands, Denmark and Germany’. Transport Reviews, 28(4), pp.495-528.

Sanchez de Madariaga’s (2013) 'From Women in Transport to Gender in Transport'

All our courses can be offered as in-house training